Waitangi Day

I went to Waitangi for Waitangi Day and it got me wondering about commemorations, celebrations, blandness and what's missing

The chap waiting in the Mr Whippy queue with me wearing his grandfather's Maori Warden helmet used the 'c' word. So did one of the aunties on the waka stage, as she introduced her kapahaka group. It's a word that seems to be edging its way into Waitangi Day events, but one that deserves a bit of thought. The 'c' word? "Celebration".

The rules were pretty clear and the ethnic sports tournament hardly unprecidented, so why the fuss about the Maori Basketball tournament? Is this Waitangi fever?

There's nowt like a wee ethnic bun-fight to kick-off Waitangi weekend, and it's been delivered this year by a pakeha basketball coach who's been told his team can't go to the [basket]ball because he's not Maori. Cue outrage.

Waitangi Day events played out more peacefully than expected, but the risk of division remains if we don't pay attention to public opinion

Another Waitangi Day has come and gone. While there were still a few protesters they were pretty nominal. There has been the usual dialogue around the event as the country struggles to settle just what to do with the day.

John Key's Waitangi Day speech defended February 6 as our national day, acknowledged our willingness to look back and pointed out that we're not a nation of flag wavers. But why not and why shouldn't we be?

There is something about a beginning; about the hope it represents and the faith that it will lead somewhere, the fact that it is always the hardest part and often the truest. Our beginning is Waitangi Day, our national day, and John Key has again demonstrated his gut appreciation of what it means to us as a nation.

Five reasons why talk of turning ANZAC Day into our national day is not smart

I took my son to an ANZAC Day service today. He's three and it was his first attendance. We talked about soldiers, not wanting to fight, sometimes needing to fight mean people, and bravery. The sun shone like no other ANZAC Day I can remember, and with my grandad's World War I medals in my pocket I thought, this isn't my national day.