racism

The mosque attacks are weighing heavy on our hearts, but grief is not the only rock we carry. We must look hard at ourselves, our communities, our history, our bigotry and - if we are all us - face it all

A haunting weight. It presses down with dizzying effect, defying easy description. Its surface etched with the familiar language of human loss, heavy with regret and shame. But some rocks we must carry.

You commit the “no true Kiwi” fallacy by insisting that bigotry isn’t the real Kiwi way. Doing so isn’t just flawed reasoning, it ignores those for whom bigotry is a very real part of their lives. Instead: listen, re-examine, aspire, and be a helper.

The “no true Scotsman” fallacy

A new biography of James Buchanan, a founder of economist’s public choice theory, suggests he was not only anti-democratic but was working with others to revoke democracy in America.

The work of economist and social philosopher James Buchanan (1919-2013) came to prominence in the mid-1980s when he was awarded the Economics Prize in honour of Alfred Nobel and when his thinking was impacting on Rogernomics (more of that next week).

Ask Google what "Maori are", and you get some pretty nasty suggestions. Whose fault is that (hint - look at the people around you)?

[Pre-publication update: Wow - that was quick! In the midst of writing this post (started at 11 am), it appears that the "problem" it discusses has been addressed by Google disabling the predictive search function for certain "high risk" searches.

Robust free speech must be strenuously protected, but a written rant by a New Zealand First MP goes beyond defensible lazy thinking to racist insult, and must be condemned

There's nothing quite like a political foot-in-mouth story; indeed, journalists go out of their way to provoke those in power to mis-speak as a way of testing their suitability for high office. So it's quite an achievement when a politician, writing in the calm of his own home or office, inserts his foot so firmly and offensively into his own trap. Take a bow, Richard Prosser.