Privy Council

The Privy Council says that Teina Pora should not face another trial. Now we can get on with trying to make some reparation for the wrong we did to him.

According to Radio NZ, the Privy Council has recommended that Teina Pora should not face a retrial for the rape and murder of Susan Burdett. This is great news.

Teina Pora is out of jail at last. Just how is it that he's spent more than half his life in there?

Being Pundit readers, there's no real need for me to tell you that the title of this post comes from Franz Kafka's The Trial. I thought it an apt source for a discussion of the unease which Teina Pora's case causes me as a "lawyer", because his experiences through the legal system are the sort of thing that the overused term "Kafkaesque" for once actually fits.

Parliament is planning to pass a law saying how much freedom its members (and others involved in its proceedings) have from legal liability. What's more, it's telling the courts that they've stuffed that issue up.

  

It’s too early to say whether the Privy Council’s Barlow decision marks a tectonic shift in the law governing criminal appeals—or a minor refinement—but it does offer much-needed reassurance about appellate courts’ willingness to do justice

Last Thursday the Privy Council dismissed John Barlow’s appeal. It held that the case against him was overwhelming, and the Board felt sure of his guilt. The case marks a change in the law governing criminal appeals.

Paula Bennett axes $200,000 conference; KiwiSaver changes cost taxpayers; National fast-tracks First 100 Days legislation; Hanover investors agree to rescue package; parents warned about dangers of "co-sleeping"; Privy Council rejects Bain's request

New Social Development Minister Paula Bennett has axed a Families Commission "summit" planned for February because it was too expensive, reports the Herald. The $200,000 event for 150 people was to take place at Auckland's Waipuna Lodge.