economy

The short answer is no; the long answer requires an explanation of what form that revolution will take.

We all know we’re shafting the planet, and headlines every other week are making sure we don’t forget. As another Conference of the Parties (COP) conference kicks off this week - this time in Poland, this time called COP24 - we have been warned that decisive action in the next two years will be crucial.

The deficit-funded tax cuts that National gave the high income earners is still being paid for by borrowing.

When National won office at the end of 2008, they had a mandate to give median income earners a tax cut 'north of $50 a week'. At the time John Key made that promise he explicitly pledged not to increase GST to pay for it.  

"National is not going to be raising GST," he fibbed. "What I am saying is if we do a half-decent job as a government at growing our economy I am confident that won't be happening."

Heh. "Half-decent."

What we are witnessing is an old fashioned ideological debate, dressed up as economics.

The high dollar and its causes suit people who have a lot of New Zealand-denominated wealth; a lower dollar is better for producers - people who use capital to earn money.

Commentators keep talking of our dollar as if it were some kind of national phallic symbol. They say it is reaching parity with Australia because Australia's economy is terrible and ours is much better. We are much better off here, they claim.

National's campaign strategy is starting to look shakey, and it's as much to do with the economy and discipline as Dirty Politics

John Key has been relying more than usual on the scripted spin when it comes to defending his administration after the revelations in Nicky Hager's Dirty Politics, one of his most popular being that Hager's claims were "dissolving before his eyes". But instead, the claims have stacked up and it's National's famed discipline that's fading.

It's now or never for Labour, starting with monetary policy and legal highs

With two big announcements in the next few days, Labour has a chance to change the conversation away from its own self-destructive nature to its hopes for New Zealand. This is an essential pivot week for Labour, because with just 20 weeks until election day it's running out of last chances.