democracy

A Harvard academic explains why some kinds of democracy are becoming less popular.

Too often we discuss ‘democracy’ without defining the term; too frequently the result is talking at cross-purposes. This confusion has become acute in recent years when discussing whether ‘democracy’ is in retreat (the subtext being that it was in an expansionary phase not so long ago).

The connection between famines and democracy may not be obvious. but each sheds light upon the other.

The fourth Saturday in each November is Holodomor Remembrance Day which recalls the great Ukrainian famine of 1932-3 in which 2.4m to 7m died in a population of about 30m. The intensity of the distress and suffering was such that more than 2,500 people were convicted of cannibalism.

It's a new year and we're all getting back to work. One of the things you have to add to your "to do" list in the next fortnight is be a good democratic citizen.

Reluctant as I am to start my 2016 Punditing by laying a guilt trip on you, that's what I'm going to end this post with. Some context, first.

The outrageous sham that Egypt's President calls independent justice should stand as a warning not just to journalists working in the country, but to Egyptians themselves. If Sisi can stare down world-wide condemnation, think how little thought he will give to anyone who has no international voice

Politicians can not function without media exposure - whether that be fair or propaganda.

Political journalists can not function without politicians - be they democratic, autocratic or anywhere in between.

The symbiosis of these two spheres legitimizes the respective worlds of voters and audience/readers.

The latest massacre of pro-Morsi supporters at the hands of the Egyptian military shows the country's push towards democracy is probably going to get a whole lot uglier before it secures the prize. 

The fragility of Egypt intensifies by the hour as a civil war scenario gathers more momentum.

It has not been helped by the latest killings of pro-Morsi protesters by the army, which unsurprisingly has provoked a Muslim Brotherhood call for an intifada against that army  until deposed President Morsi is back in the Presidential Palace.