defamation

We might think the participants in the Craig v Slater defamation decision got what they deserved ... but for the fact that one of them continues to have to relive something she would far, far rather put behind her. 

The finally decided defamation proceedings in Craig v Slater must be the stuff of judicial nightmares. A complicated fact pattern involving two deeply unsympathetic parties. The application of finely balanced questions of law, which are upset part way through your deliberations by a new decision from a higher court.

What do Barbra Streisand and Sir Bob Jones have in common? It’s all about the Streisand effect.  

When lawyers read news like Sir Bob Jones threatening defamation proceedings because a tweet called him a racist we feel a strange mix of emotions. 

Jordan Williams' apparently crushing defamation victory from last year carried within it the seeds of its own demise. And in overturning that victory, the High Court has some less than complementry things to say about his own behaviour. 

This week is shaping up as a banner one for those few unusual individuals who consider defamation law an area

The defamation case against Andrew Little did not result in his having to pay any damages. All in all, I think that is a good thing for the country as a whole.

Despite a degree of ambiguity over the outcome, Andrew Little appears to have come out ahead in the defamation action brought against him by Earl and Lani Hagaman. 

Colin Craig is on a one-man mission to rid politics of untruths and distortions. Good luck with that!

Here's an idea for a fun game. Try and write a blogpost that says what Russel Norman did about Colin Craig, but in a way that avoids getting a letter from Chapman Tripp threatening you with a defamation action.