David Bain

David Bain's claim for compensation is starting to look more and more like Charlie Brown's attempt to kick the football.

According to the stuff.co.nz website, John Key said the following about Judith Collin's decision to seek further legal advice (actually, a review of the review) on David Bain's claim for compensation:

It looks like a lot of people owe David Bain an apology - as well as an awful lot of cash. Here's my contribution (to the apologies, anyway).

The beauty of this blogging lark is that it is very easy to quickly develop an opinion on whatever happens to be prominent in the news on a given day, pad it out into a few hundred words with a couple of links, throw it up onto the web ... then move on to next week's installment.

David Bain has filed a claim for compensation with the Minister of Justice. He'll be damn lucky to get it.

So David Bain has decided to apply for compensation for wrongful imprisonment following his acquittal at his 2009 retrial. Fair enough. If he really did spend 13 years behind bars for something he did not do, then we collectively owe him a lot of money.

You might think a jury's "not guilty" verdict finally puts a matter to rest but David Bain is discovering that it can be just the beginning

While the David Bain trial was still running, I tried my best to avoid getting captured in its myriad of details. I feared it would be the legal equivalent of Uncle Remus' tar baby, with the slightest contact inexorably trapping me as surely as Brer Rabbit.

David Bain's retrial is now in the hands of the jury. Their verdict will bring down the curtain on a superb piece of legal theatre

There's a reason why so many movies and TV shows are set in the criminal courtroom. Trials not only revolve around the seamiest, hence most enthralling, of human activities (sex, violence, deceit and greed), but they operate in a neatly packaged format involving clear and predictable procedures. The prosecution has its say. The defence has its rebuttal.