Christchurch mosque shootings

There's no way to guarantee safety in an imperfect world, but you would hope to have confidence in the Police's ability to keep guns under lock and key. It seems not

Sometimes you have to pinch yourself to convince yourself what you're reading is real. My previous column was on the gun debate – it solicited a number of sensible comments. Then, as if eager to underline one of my points, Police fumbled.

I value the guns I own, but with ownership comes responsibility and it's reasonable to expect licences and those who enfore them to ensure the safety of all New Zealanders

Given the public mood following the Christchurch terror attacks, I have felt some discomfort in admitting I hold a firearms licence. Understandbly, in the wake of the mosque shootings, there is a very strong anti-firearms sentiment in the public mind.

At first blush the censorship of the Christchurch killer's document explaining the attacks may look like a serious intrusion on free speech. But context and content are everything

The Chief Censor, David Shanks, has ruled The Great Replacement, supposedly the manifesto of the Christchurch terrorist, to be an objectionable piece of work. Accordingly, it is an offence for any person to possess, copy or distribute the work in New Zealand. 

When something wicked this way comes, what do you do? I hope in time we can make space for study and understanding. Let's find the courage to look at where the hate came from and counter it with facts and truth as well as compassion.

One of the most powerful of the many powerful stories coming out of Christchurch in the past week, is that of 71 year-old Haji-Daoud Nabi, who greeted the gunman at the door of the mosque with a warm, "Hello brother...". Nabi was the first to die.

Whitcoulls has caused something of a furore by taking Jordan Peterson's 12 Rules for Life off its shelves. How much should we worry when books start to be censored?

In response to the Christchurch terror attacks, Whitcoulls no longer sells 12 Rules for Life by controversial psychologist Jordan Peterson. It's hard to understand, precisely, what this will achieve. 

I’ve never been able to finish the book myself but that’s more because I found it uninteresting rather than morally repugnant.