AgResearch

As the rest of the world moves towards more GE food, New Zealand stands apart. And while that may make little scientific sense, it could be very good for our bank balance

An article published a month ago in the Daily Mail prompted GE Free New Zealand to

With our leading science organisations 'right-sizing' and science funding stalled, is the government's approach to science meeting the needs of New Zealand now and in the future?

Good quality science, data and insights are required to transform what is done on the land. Deputy Prime Minister Bill English was last year urging farmers to use "good science", while more recently farmers have been urging regional councils to base their policies on facts and evidence.

We waited and, in one sense, wasted decades, scientifically establishing carbon emissions, and their effects. Now its about sequestration, on and in the ground: a different issue, yet the same

Science told us the risks of climate change. We needed it, to explain how nature works, in a way that no one can observe.

Now, it joins the race for good solutions. Where the science is disputed, as it is on soil carbon, is there time left to explain everything, paper by paper, and peer-review? And yet, there’s no time, either, to waste on crackpot theories.

Ports of Auckland could be privatised; Government ditches green schemes; police investigation of Bain murders under scrutiny; agricultural "super-university" proposed; Auckland and Wellington now cheaper to live in; national cycleway gets the tick

It has been suggested that the country's largest port be sold into private ownership, reports the Herald.