by Tim Watkin

When something wicked this way comes, what do you do? I hope in time we can make space for study and understanding. Let's find the courage to look at where the hate came from and counter it with facts and truth as well as compassion.

One of the most powerful of the many powerful stories coming out of Christchurch in the past week, is that of 71 year-old Haji-Daoud Nabi, who greeted the gunman at the door of the mosque with a warm, "Hello brother...". Nabi was the first to die.

As we start to wrestle with the pain and lessons of this heart-rending act of terror in Christchurch, let us not fall into the trap of being driven by fear and ignorance. Because that's how this all began

As we wake up the day after 49 people were murdered at two mosques in Christchurch, it's to a flurry of comments about how New Zealand will never be the same, has lost its innocence and is no longer beyond the reach of the world's evil.

Look at those Greens, trying to stack the deck to ensure they cling to power, eh? Except that argument makes little sense and stops us having a proper squiz at how we should run the country

Politics is an odd kind of game that sometimes requires a ruthless self-interest and at others altruistic self-sacrifice. It's a patchwork of ideals and deals, virtue and vice, gamble and calculation.

The spadework has been done and the Labour-led government now has to decide whether it can afford to walk through the door labelled 'Capital Gaints Tax'... and they need to know who will follow

And so now, as was always inevitable, it comes down to political courage. Has Jacinda Ardern and her coaltion got the will and the numbers to introduce a proper capital gains tax?

I'm shocked I tell you. Shocked... Shocked that anyone would be surprised by tonight's Newshub-Reid Research poll. The seasons of politics are turning as expected. The complicating factor is Judith Collins.

The headlines cry crisis for National and Simon Bridges. The latest Newshub Reid Research poll has landed a series of blows on Bridges and his party – National is down, Bridges is down and Collins is up. Wham, bam and thank you Ma'am.

I went to Waitangi for Waitangi Day and it got me wondering about commemorations, celebrations, blandness and what's missing

The chap waiting in the Mr Whippy queue with me wearing his grandfather's Maori Warden helmet used the 'c' word. So did one of the aunties on the waka stage, as she introduced her kapahaka group. It's a word that seems to be edging its way into Waitangi Day events, but one that deserves a bit of thought. The 'c' word? "Celebration".

Donald Trump is being backed into a corner politically and legally, with the Mueller investigation expected soon. How far will he go and can America's famed checks and balances withstand the coming storm?

It was a warm November evening on the gulf coast of Florida. President Trump was flying in for a rally two days before the mid-terms and the taxi driver taking us there was a Republican. “Government doesn’t always know best,” he reckoned. “The working man should decide for himself”. But he was a Never Trump Republican, worried about where this mad, bad presidency might end.

Simon Wilson has had another tilt in today's Herald at sparking debate about a focal point for Auckland's waterfront (hint: it's not a stadium). I like his thinking, but reckon he's got one significant detail wrong

Auckland's One Big Thing. It's something I've long argued the city needs, as have many others. Something to act as an anchor, focal point and symbol in this city that so lacks identity.

The extent of spying by several public sector agencies goes to a worrying lack of public service at the heart of our public service

A glance at yesterday's news agenda and 'Government to hold binding cannabis referendum' would have looked like a much more promising and intriguing story than 'State Services Commission releases report'. Ya- and -wn.

The open letter to Jacinda Ardern to show some spine over alleged crimes against Anne-Marie Brady feels vital in the face of a less than urgent response thus far. The professor was only a mechanic away from being another Jamal Khashoggi or Fernando Pereira

The precise words Jacinda Ardern chooses when she finally addresses the claims by University of Canterbury professor Anne-Marie Brady will be telling, but at least she has Donald Trump to look to and the case of Jamal Khashoggi as inspiration.