by Baden Vertongen

If our Courts don’t get the point of a mihi, then will they get what is really being said in arguments over mana whenua or tangihanga practices? Or, why appearances in Te Reo are more than a question of linguistic choice.

Last week there was a bit of media reporting around a High Court hearing and the use of Te Reo Māori.

The Supreme Court has this week released a judgment that not only raises issues for the Crown’s settlement negotiations with Hauraki, but it also marks a shift in how the Court sees its relationship with Parliament. 

This week the Supreme Court dipped its toes into the troubled waters of the Crown’s settlement negotiations with Hauraki iwi. It did so in a decisionon whether or not Ngāti Whātua can challenge elements of that settlement in court. 

The recent Criminal Justice Summit talked about the need for change – especially in terms of engagement with Māori.  But there was little about what that change might actually look like. 

There’s been plenty of media coverage and various opinion pieces following the Criminal Justice Summit last week on the need to reform the criminal justice system.  I was at the Summit too, and my own feelings from it were mixed.  

What do Barbra Streisand and Sir Bob Jones have in common? It’s all about the Streisand effect.  

When lawyers read news like Sir Bob Jones threatening defamation proceedings because a tweet called him a racist we feel a strange mix of emotions. 

There has been a call for a review of the Waitangi Tribunal based on a view that the Tribunal leans against the Crown in challenges to settlement negotiations.  Lets just fact-check that.  

Shane Jones has come out swinging against the Waitangi Tribunal and suggests it is over reaching.

Overlapping claims in Treaty settlements have been before the Supreme Court and raised on Parliament’s lawn this week. Here’s a quick explainer as to why these can be such difficult issues. 

This week has seen the issue of how to manage overlapping claims in the negotiation of Treaty of Waitangi settlements came before the Supreme Court and led to protests on Parliament grounds.

Existing legal and institutional concepts do not serve Māori organisations well. What needs to change?

Once again the issue of accountability within Māori organizations is back in the news following some examples of dodgy behavior.