Ethnic violence spreads in Kyrgyzstan; human rights groups urge international involvement in Kyrgyz crisis; Taiwanese company that makes iPads and iPhones will more than double wages; trouble in Iran one year after election; US finds minerals in Afghanistan

Top of the Agenda: Kyrgyz Ethnic Violence Spreads

 

Ethnic violence spread (WashPost) in southern Kyrgyzstan, raising fears of a humanitarian crisis. As many as eighty thousand people fled across the border to Uzbekistan, with hundreds of others killed or injured by Kyrgyz mobs trampling through ethnic Uzbek villages. Human rights groups urged the international community to intervene. Kyrgyzstan's interim government acknowledged its loss of control and appealed to Russia to send troops. But neither Russia nor the United States, which both have military bases in Kyrgyzstan, appeared willing to contribute peacekeeping troops. The United States and Russia are trying to coordinate a response through the United Nations or another international institution, according to one Obama official. It is unclear what sparked the violence, which began Thursday in Osh, the country's second largest city. Local officials have accused supporters of recently deposed president Kurmanbek Bakiyev of fueling conflict to undermine the interim government ahead of a referendum this month on a new constitution.

For the United States, Kyrgyzstan is a vital transit hub (WSJ) for supplies to the war in Afghanistan. For Russia, the Kyrgyz crisis is a test to exert greater influence in the region.

Analysis:

In the Eurasia Daily Monitor, Erica Marat says the "general sense of chaos" in the country has overshadowed some important positives for Kyrgyzstan's politics.

 

PACIFIC RIM: Chinese Wage Hikes Continue

 

The Taiwanese company Foxconn, which makes iPads and iPhones for Apple, said it will more than double (BBC) its staff's wages by October, after a double-digit pay increase for workers that supply Honda in China.

South Korea: South Korea stressed the need to bolster military readiness (AP) as part of its response to North Korea's sinking of the South Korean ship Cheonan in March.

 

ELSEWHERE:

- Clashes in Iran One Year After Election
- U.S. Finds Afghan Mineral Riches

 

This is an excerpt of the CFR.org Daily News Brief. The full version is available on CFR.org

 

 

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