John Key

….but only if they can sort out their own muddled messages.


John Key’s promise not to promise anything in his pre-budget speech last week revealed some serious muddle in National’s thinking. The tried and tested rule is that governments spend in the bad times to stimulate the economy when no-one else can, and save in the good times.

I wrote a column in the National Business Review this weekend, and it’s driving right-wingers there nuts.

Bill English believes the government shouldn't bother with trying to promote added value exports. If the market wants raw logs, then that's what we should sell.

While Judith Collins was in China, she perhaps should have read some Sun Tzu: “If ignorant both of your enemy and yourself, you are certain to be in peril.”

It's a new week, and so the beginning of a new political era. Why, then, am I bothering going all the way back to the ancient past of the start of the month, in order to write about Judith Collins' by-now-infamous and well-raked-over troubled trip to China last year?

The announcement of the election date was an opportunity for the left to define the campaign. It can’t afford any more missed opportunities.

It wasn’t like we didn’t know it was coming. The announcement of the date today has highlighted the fact that the left now has six months to add five per cent to its support, find and mobilise a couple of hundred thousand people, change perceptions of the government, announce a manifesto, promote its own vision and raise around a million dollars a month. 

David Cunliffe's Trust and the Dinner at Antoine's were not the same. I wish they were, but they just aren't.

There's been a bit of lefty gloating going on around the traps about Patrick Gower's interview with John Key on The Nation, in which he sought to draw an equivalence between David Cunliffe's use of a trust to receive donations for his Labour leader